Is The Midnight Club based on a true story or a book?

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The story of The Midnight Club on Netflix is ​​about a group of dying children who live in a place called Brightcliffe.

They set up a secret club where they meet at midnight every night and tell each other spooky stories. Ilonka is the main character of the story. When she goes to the hospice, she learns some dark things about it. The show, made by Mike Flanagan and Leah Fong, is structured like a story within a story. It shows how children’s minds work as they try to confront their own mortality and find out spooky things about the place they call home. Here’s what you need to know about the show if you want to know what got the people who made it into it.

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The Midnight Club

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Is The Midnight Club based on actual events?

The Midnight Club is not based on a true story. Instead, it is based on the book of the same name by Christopher Pike (pen name for Kevin McFadden). The show also adapts some of Pike’s other favorite books, such as Witch, Gimme a Kiss, The Wicked Heart and Road to Nowhere. Pike came up with the idea for The Midnight Club after talking to a young teenager who was dying of cancer. She liked Pike’s books and as a last wish her parents tried to get in touch with the author so that she could get to know him.

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Pike was unable to meet the girl because she lived across the country, but he kept in touch with her through letters and phone calls. She told him that she and a few other hospital patients would get together that evening to talk about his books. Pike wrote “The Midnight Club” as a tribute to her and her friends, but instead of talking about his own stories, he made up new ones. Pike offered to give the girl the first draft of the book, but she said she wouldn’t read it until it came out in print. She didn’t make it until Pike was done, which was a shame.

When the book came out, Mike Flanagan was blown away. Unlike other horror books Flanagan had read at the time, this one was about young adults and spoke of serious things like death. “His work has had a huge impact on me. He wrote fairly advanced stuff for his younger readers, and his teenage characters often died in shocking ways. I found a lot of exciting, scary and dark in his books. So I was kind of addicted to it,” he said.

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When Flanagan began writing and directing films a few years later, he chose The Midnight Club as his first film. He wrote a screenplay and received money for it from his family and friends. Flanagan’s first low-budget film had everything it needed. But when he told Pike’s publishers about it, they sent him a letter telling him to stop. He was sad about it, but he turned to other projects and became known for horror films like Gerald’s Game and The Haunting of Hill House. Still, he couldn’t stop thinking about The Midnight Club.

“The Midnight Club really surprised me as a teenager. I thought I was going to get a creepy YA novella about the Grim Reaper or something. But that wasn’t the point. Instead, it was about how teenagers deal with terminal illnesses and death. And it didn’t hesitate to do so either. He said, “It was a great lesson in how to use genres to talk about very serious issues.” He again brought up the idea of ​​a remake, but this time it was a TV show. Luckily, Pike said yes this time, and Flanagan not only got to adapt The Midnight Club, but also got to use other Pike stories on the show.

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In producing the Netflix show, the people behind it were determined to stay true to the story and its themes. For Leah Fong, the stories told by the children at Brightcliffe Hospice were about making a mark. “As writers, we all make things and try to leave something behind, just like these kids do with their stories. It’s what keeps us going no matter what. She said, “They make their own ghosts, something to leave behind when they die.” “Having a say in the last days of his life” was important to Flanagan. Although both the show and the book that inspired it are fictional, the writer and the people who made the show have tried to keep the stories as real as possible so that everyone can understand them.

No one watches a horror show hoping for a fun time, but Netflix’s latest is sad even by the standards of the horror genre. The Midnight Club takes place at the Brightcliffe Hospice for Teens, where young people who have been told they are going to die spend their final days. They also get together at night to tell scary stories so they can have a little fun before they die.

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This nighttime storytelling is based on the work of Christopher Pike, whose young adult mysteries have been a gateway drug for many new horror fans. The show’s creators, Mike Flanagan and Leah Fong, then piece together Pike’s entire body of work. It’s a neat idea – so much horror depends on the suspense of whether the characters make it to the credits or not, but here we start with death as a given – but it ends up being a patchwork quilt that’s not very smooth.

The Midnight Club
The Midnight Club

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The Midnight Club is Flanagan’s fourth Netflix show. In his first film, Hush, he scared a deaf woman and breathed new life into the slasher genre. In Gerald’s game, he built up to a scene where he took off his gloves that nearly destroyed the internet. Flanagan was able to create his own horror subgenre because he made the streaming giants happy. Its miniseries was based on the works of Shirley Jackson, Henry James and Stephen King, and next year’s The Fall of the House of Usher will be based on Edgar Allan Poe. The Haunting of Hill House (by Jackson) was a hit, but The Haunting of Bly Manor (by James) was boring and sad. While there are some flaws, Flanagan’s respect for the books that inspired his work keeps this tribute to Pike interesting throughout.

All actors do a great job. Unable to rely on his regular cast, Flanagan assembled a new cast of young actors to play the dying teenagers. Iman Benson is Ilonka, and when she found out she had cancer, she was on her way to an Ivy League college. Though she’s decided to spend her final days in Brightcliffe, she can’t disagree with Samantha Sloyan’s sinister naturalist, who appears to have come from Goop HQ via Salem. No one has ever been so creepy with a blueberry in hand.

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At first glance, the other residents seem like a morbid breakfast club with familiar teenage stereotypes like Igby Rigney’s dreamy boy next door Kevin, William Chris Sumpter’s smart Spence, and Annarah Cymone’s innocent Sandra. But even the best of them can’t quite match Ruth Codd’s screen debut as nihilistic rebel Anya in the TikTok star’s film debut (Flanagan cleverly snapped her for House of Usher). The young actors are good at primal screams and heartbreaking monologues, but those who want to see Flanagan’s regulars shouldn’t worry: His favorites make tasty guest appearances throughout the film.

No matter how good someone is on screen, the story is a mess that needs cleaning up. In each episode we spend time in the worlds the characters make up as they tell stories at night, but none of them are as interesting as what’s going on in Brightcliffe, except perhaps for Anya’s nightmare about her double, The Two Danas. First, the series strikes a good balance between the two levels of fiction. However, it quickly tips the scales towards the ponderous allegories of the stories it tells, which is frustrating. After Sumpter delivers a heartbreaking speech to his estranged mother that walks the line between melodrama and melancholy, it’s frustrating to see him dumped with a silly sci-fi idea.

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Criticizing each other’s stories, the characters break the fourth wall to say, “Anyone can hit someone in the head with pots and pans. That’s not scary; it’s just surprising. And it’s a waste of time.” But while The Midnight Club isn’t lazy, the fact that it uses a lot of tired tropes isn’t the same as turning them on their head. Pike’s books are known for their risqué endings, but The Midnight Club’s ending is the weakest. It adds many new threads in a hurry to set up future episodes, although the premise doesn’t warrant it. As death would always happen, it’s a shame The Midnight Club doesn’t understand the power of a good death.

Mike Flanagan’s work for Netflix has given fans goosebumps year after year. Since his first series for streaming platform The Haunting of Hill House, the writer-director has shown that he knows how to pull off emotional gut punches and subtle stories that keep us all on edge. Overall, The Midnight Club doesn’t have as much depth or a good story as its other books, but it does have some good points.

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As is often the case with Flanagan’s work, none of the performances are bad. William Chris Sumpter’s performance as Spencer is the best, but the rest of the young cast did a good job with their roles as well. Of course, it wouldn’t be a Mike Flanagan series without Flanafam, and Samantha Sloyan (who starred in Flanagan’s Hush and Midnight Mass) kills as always. There are other characters from Flanagan’s other works that make an appearance in the series, but we’ll be keeping those surprises a secret for now.

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