Where is survivor Sandra Cheskey now?

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The show “No One Can Hear You Scream: Gitchie Manitou Massacre” on Investigation Discovery follows the brutal killing of Roger Essem, Michael Hadrath, Stewart and Dana Baade in November 1973 at the Gitchie Manitou State Preserve in Sioux Falls, Iowa.

It also tells what happened after the accident and the story of the only person who survived, Sandra Cheskey. Who is Sandra and where is she now? let’s find out

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Sandra Cheskey

What is Sandra Cheskey’s name?

In the fall of 1973, Sandra Cheskey Chrans was a 13-year-old girl at school. In 1972 she had just moved to the tea country and was a seventh grader at Harrisburg Middle School. She recounted how she met 17-year-old Roger Norman Essem in the early summer of 1973 at a drive-in movie theater in Sioux Falls, Iowa. She met him on the way back to her car from the concession stand. She said, “I’ve seen the most attractive man I’ve ever seen.”

So it was a surprise that Roger stopped to talk to her instead of just walking by. During their conversation, he asked her for her phone number. “And that’s how we met,” Sandra said with a smile. Before the fateful night of November 17, 1973, they went on about three or four more dates. On most of those dates, his friend Stewart W. Baade drove them in his blue 1967 van.

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On November 17, 1973, Sandra went with Roger, Stewart, Dana E. Baade, and Michael Robert Hadrath to Gitchie Manitou State Preserve on the Iowa-South Dakota border, east of Sioux Falls. It was a place where minors could wander and have beer parties. The group of teenagers smoked weed and strummed a guitar by the campfire. All four boys were much older than Sandra, but she didn’t mind because she had been raised in foster care and attended a missionary school, where she was used to being around older children.

Around 10pm, about 20 minutes into their chill session, the group heard the sound of branches and twigs moving. Robert went to see what was making the noise, thinking it was a wild animal. When he got there, he was shot at. The terrified group was then met by the three Fryer brothers, who were pretending to be drug agents. Investigators later found Allen Earl, David and James Fryer were hunting wild animals when they encountered the group of people and decided to attack them.

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Allen would then kidnap Sandra while his other two brothers would kill the other two teenagers and move with Allen to a farm near Hartford. Then James would sexually assault her, and Allen would take her home because he felt sorry for her. “Allen wasn’t the brightest light bulb,” said a former agent with the Iowa Bureau of Criminal Investigation. After the boys were killed and it was just him and her in the truck, I guess he realized that she was a person and not just a figure in the woods. He couldn’t kill her because she stayed calm while they talked.

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Where is Sandra Cheskey right now?

Sandra would help the police find the three Fryer brothers and find out who they were. She was also the prosecution’s best witness, and her testimony was a major reason all three Fryer brothers were found guilty and sentenced to life in prison without a chance of parole. But life at home was not easy for her then. At first, people questioned her credibility and condemned her for hanging out with boys older than her.

Back in school, almost all of her classmates avoided her after being told to do so by their parents. At home, her father did not do much to comfort or help her. Sandra said: “I had nightmares for years and my mother crept into bed with me when I was 15 years old.” This shows that her mother tried to help her. But Sandra stopped going to school after a few months because her mother had two jobs and was rarely there.

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From her childhood until her marriage at the age of 26, she kept her head down. In 2016 she would write a bestseller about the event, and in 2018 she would write a sequel. According to the news, Sandra and her family now reside in Iowa. She often visits the victims’ families in Sioux Falls, with whom she has a good relationship. She also travels across the country to sign copies of her books and speaks out for survivors on social media.

Roger Essem, 17, Stewart Baade, 18, Mike Hadrath, 15, and Dana Baade, 14, all died.

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The question of why Sandra Cheskey was the only one to survive the nightmare that transformed Gitchie Manitou from a place where people wandered and hosted beer parties for underage people has never been fully answered. Many people still say that the place is haunted.

But the horrific story of what happened that night, and the fact that she was only 13 when Allen, James and David Fryer walked up to the teenagers at the conservation area, posing as cops and threatening to take their marijuana, changes things himself not. They shot their four friends before taking them to be raped and then letting them go.

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However, it didn’t end there. Afterwards, Cheskey would leave with her head bowed so that she would not be seen by the media. Then it was easier to keep it quiet so she didn’t have to deal with the judgmental looks of people wondering why a girl her age was dating guys four or five years her senior that night. Or the people wondering if she made it because she helped kill people. Or the parents who told their kids not to talk to that Gitchie Manitou girl.

When asked how her life was after the incident, the 53-year-old wife, mother and grandmother said softly, “Terrible.” “I felt embarrassed and alone,” she said.

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Sandra Cheskey
Sandra Cheskey

want to tell grandchildren the truth

Today, Cheskey’s inner strength, which has been building for a long time, begins to convince her that she should tell her story, mainly for the benefit of her family, but also to remind people that she and the others were just victims that night were .

Last Monday, she met with former Lyon County Sheriff Craig Vinson at his home in Rock Rapids, Iowa. They spoke about the time they spent together during the ordeal. She returned to Gitchie Manitou on Wednesday with her husband and a few friends to remember every spooky moment and, if possible, to put the spirits to rest.

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“My grandchildren go to Google Gitchie Manitou and when they see my name they’ll read horrible things they don’t know,” she said softly. “I have 12-year-old nieces.” They’ll be 13 and they’re pretty smart for their age. I just don’t want them to find it and be surprised and upset at what they find. I want them to know that what happened was a terrible thing and that Grandma did nothing wrong.”

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In the fall of 1973 I was in the 7th grade in Harrisburg

In the fall of 1973, “Grandma” was still a schoolgirl. She had moved to the Tea area from Minnesota just a year earlier and was in seventh grade in the Harrisburg School District.

Earlier this summer, she was walking from the concession stand at a drive-in movie theater in Sioux Falls to her car when, from afar, she saw “the most beautiful man I’ve ever seen in my life.”

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Roger Essem didn’t just walk past her; He stopped and started talking to her, then asked for her phone number. “And that’s how we met,” Cheskey said.

Sandra Cheskey (right), her husband Carroll (center) and boyfriend Kevin Kunkel (left) walk up the ledge where the Fryer brothers lived 40 years ago at the Gitchie Manitou Federal Preserve near Granite, Iowa on Cheskey and Four of her friends shot.

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She said there were three or four dates after that and Essem’s boyfriend Stewart Baade, who had a blue van and drove her, was there almost all the time.

Cheskey didn’t care that Baade and Essem were different ages because they both attended Washington High School. Her mother had married a man who didn’t have much time for Cheskey and her brothers. In fact, he was able to convince his wife that it was best to put her in foster care and then in a mission school in Marty. Because of all of these things, Cheskey was used to being around older kids.

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She said of her mother’s husband: “I wasn’t a bad girl. I just think he made a mistake marrying a woman with four kids and didn’t know how to get rid of us.” “I think I grew up faster because I lived in two foster homes and then went to school at Marty Mission. It was hard being there.”

On November 17, Essem asked his girlfriend to go with him to Gitchie Manitou. They had a few joints with marijuana. They wanted to make a campfire, and Stewart Baade brought his guitar. Dana, Baade’s little brother, and Mike Hadrath, a good friend from their neighborhood in Whittier, also came.

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Leland Baade, who lives in Aberdeen and lost his two younger brothers that night, said the four boys were particularly close.

Baade, who is 60, said: “These were children who mostly kept to themselves.” “There were also bullies back then, so the four of them hung out alone and didn’t bother anyone. Both my brothers liked music. Stewart played the guitar fairly well, and Dana learned how to play the bass. The two got along really well.”

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The elder Baade recalled that his mother had bronchitis at the time and was in McKennan Hospital. He went to his brothers’ house that day to find out what they were doing that night. They told him they were going to this park to make a campfire and play their guitars.

Bill Hadrath can’t remember if he knew that Mike, his brother two years his junior, was planning to go to Gitchie Manitou with the others, although it wouldn’t have been such a big deal if he had known.

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Bill Hadrath, 57, said of his Sioux Falls home, “I was probably out there at some point when there were probably a hundred other kids out there.” “There were a lot of parties there, and most of them had beer.

Lynette Hadrath Dahl remembers her brother Mike telling his mother that he was going to spend the night at the Essem house. There’s nothing strange about that. Marilyn Hadrath gave her son some money that night and watched him swing around the backyard on the clothesline.

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Marilyn Hadrath never forgot that picture and often thought about her son’s final moments afterwards, said Dahl, who is now 50 and lives in Lake Park, Minn.

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